Monday, July 21, 2008

Remembering the vision of Corbin Harney


Corbin Harney and Olsaus Suleimenov at the Nevada Test Site near Mercury in 1990. Photo by Linda Putnam
Sent by Ian Zabarte
Secretary of State for the Western Shoshone Government

Corbin Harney was Spiritual Leader of the Western Shoshone National Council. Sometimes called "The hardest working man in shamanism," Harney, for many years, spent most of his time travelling around the world spreading a message about the dangers of nuclear energy and the problems facing our Mother Earth.
"The Mother Earth provides us with food, provides us with air, provides us with water. We, the people, are going to have to put our thoughts together, to save our planet here. We've only got one water, one air, one Mother Earth."
Among other excursions, he visited mutated children in Kazakhstan hospitals who lived close to the Russian nuclear test site. He received the 2003 International Nuclear Free Future Solutions award. [3] He spoke out about the contamination of our water and shared with people a vision that he experienced several years ago.
"I was praying to the water and the spirit of the water told me, 'Pretty soon, I'm going to look like clean water, but no one is going to use me .' I didn't really understand what I was told until I went to Kazakhstan in Russia. Kazakhstan is where Russia tested nuclear bombs for many years. Over there I saw water that looks like clean water, but people can't drink it because it is contaminated with radiation ... the nature put all the living things here for us to take care of, not to destroy them, but to work with them so that we may live with them for many more years."
Olsaus Suleimenov again became a world-wide name in 1989, when he led the establishment of international environmental movement Nevada-Semipalatinsk. Nevada Semipalatinsk campaigned to close nuclear sites in Nevada and Semipalatinsk city in Kazakhstan. After independence, Suleimenov established Peoples' Congress party in 1991 and served as the speaker of Parliament until 1994. While at the Parliament, he rose to the position of opposition leader, engaging in several political struggles with President Nursultan Nazarbaev. Many opposition leaders urged him to run as a candidate in the next presidential elections. In 1995, to preempt his potential candidacy, Nazarbayev broke a deal, and Suleimenov was appointed as Kazakhstan's ambassador to Rome. Currently, he serves as Kazakhstani ambassador at UN.

Mr. Ian Zabarte, Secretary of State
Western Shoshone Government
e-mail: mrizabarte@bigfoot.com

No comments: